Reflections regarding Australian music therapy supervision: Guidance and recommendations for establishing internal and external supervisory arrangements aided by cross-national reflection

Reflections regarding Australian music therapy supervision: Guidance and recommendations for establishing internal and external supervisory arrangements aided by cross-national reflection

Abstract

Although literature regarding student supervision is expanding, information about how to establish supervisory arrangements for clinicians remains scarce. According to results from a large-scale survey in America, not all music therapists participate in supervision. Also, those that do participate in supervision may receive it from someone who works alongside them in their own organisation. In this paper, the international music therapy supervision literature is reviewed, and research findings that have emerged from America are considered in relation to the development of supervision in Australia. Results from a large-scale survey in America indicated that the most common reason for not receiving supervision was "lack of access". In response, considerations and strategies for establishing internal and external supervisory arrangements are offered in this paper. The limitations involved in reflecting upon American findings in relation to the development of supervision in Australia are also noted. Cross-national reflections prompt questions regarding clinicians' access to and choices regarding supervision. A number of strategies for clinicians, supervisors and employers are outlined to aid the development of supervisory arrangements, and support the ongoing and important development of supervision for all music therapists.

 

Keywords: Supervision, music therapy, standards


Citation

Daveson, B., & Kennelly, J. (2011). Reflections regarding Australian music therapy supervision: Guidance and recommendations for establishing internal and external supervisory arrangements aided by cross-national reflection. Australian Journal of Music Therapy, 22, 24-34.


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Date published: July 2011