The interface of music therapy and speech pathology in the rehabilitation of children with acquired brain injury

The interface of music therapy and speech pathology in the rehabilitation of children with acquired brain injury

Abstract

This article discusses the role and conjoint uses of music therapy and speech pathology to aid the treatment of acquired neurological speech and language difficulties in children attending a rehabilitation unit. Research, descriptive case studies, models for intervention and techniques used in conjoint music therapy and speech pathology are described to support the use of this approach for children with acquired speech and language difficulties. Two case studies presented to illustrate the benefits of conjoint music therapy/speech pathology. Interventions addressed the areas of facilitation of vocalisations, enhancement of vocal quality, improved breath support for speech, rhythm, coordination and timing of speech and the social uses of language. Implications for clinical practice and research using this specialised coordinated approach are also presented and discussed.

 

Keywords: music therapy; speech; rehabilitation; children; acquired brain injury


Citation

ennelly, J., Hamilton, L., & Cross, J. (2001). The interface of music therapy and speech pathology in the rehabilitation of children with acquired brain injury. Australian Journal of Music Therapy, 12, 13-20.


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Date published: July 2001